Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Lectures


SCHEDULE OF FRANCESCO CALOGERO'S LECTURES AT CONCORDIA COLLEGE



Joint T. C. Wollan and Nobel Peace Prize Lectures
Francesco Calogero
Physics Department, University of Rome “La Sapienza”
Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma
T. C. Wollan Lecture
Cool Numbers
(math and science audience)

Tuesday, November 12
Morrie Jones Conference A/B
4:00 ­-- 5:30 p.m.

Reception in the Atrium outside of Morrie Jones Conference A/B
3:30 ­ -- 4:00 p.m. and 5:30 -- 6:00 p.m.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture I
A World Free of Nuclear Weapons: Desirable? Feasible?
(general audience)

Wednesday, November 13
Barry Auditorium, Offutt School of Business
7:00 --  8:30 p.m.
Reception follows

Joint Nobel Peace Prize Lecture II and Oen Fellowship Lecture
The social responsibility of scientists: the Pugwash Conferences
on Science and World Affairs

(general audience)

Thursday, November 14

Centrum, Knutson Campus Center
7:00 -- ­ 8:30 p.m.
Reception follows

Student Panel
A World Free of Nuclear Weapons?
with a response from Francesco Calogero
(general audience)

Friday, November 15 
Frida Nilsen Lounge of Fjelstad Hall 
Main Stage, Frances Frazier Comstock Theatre
9:20 - 10:20 a.m.
___________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Francesco Calogero

Francesco Calogero is an emeritus professor at the Physics Department of the University of Rome "La Sapienza". His current research in mathematical and theoretical physics is focused on isochronous systems and related mathematical results.
Francesco Calogero published over 380 papers and four books on scientific topics. His exploration of science and society issues related to arms control and disarmament has resulted in over 440 papers and two books. Francesco Calogero co-edited, with M. Goldberger and S. Kapitza, a multi-authored monograph on verification for the purpose of monitoring disarmament, published in English in the United States (1990) and in Russian in the Soviet Union (1991). Each chapter of the book was coauthored by eminent scientists and politicians on both sides of the Cold War divide; it was the first book on such a sensitive topic to have this feature.
From 1982 to 1992 Francesco Calogero was a member of the Governing Board of the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), from 1989 to 1997 he served as Secretary General of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, and in that capacity he accepted, on behalf of Pugwash, the 1995 Nobel Peace Prize awarded to Joseph Rotblat and to Pugwash “for their efforts to diminish the part played by nuclear arms in international politics and in the longer run to eliminate such arms.” From 1997 to 2002 he served as Chairman of the Pugwash Council, of which he is now an ex officio member.

A World Free of Nuclear Weapons: Desirable? Feasible?

We will underline the special character of nuclear weapons and will discuss the desirability and the feasibility of a nuclear-weapon-free world.  Some past activities promoting nuclear disarmament and the transition to a nuclear-weapon-free world will be reviewed. We will discuss the significant developments initiated by the January 2007 Wall Street Journal op-ed coauthored by Shultz, Perry, Kissinger and Nunn, which culminated in the April 2009 Prague speech by President Obama. Finally, we will outline recent developments and future steps toward a nuclear-weapon-free world. 

The social responsibility of scientists:
the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs

As an example of the implementation of the social responsibility of scientists, we will outline a terse history and mention current activities of  the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs. This organization is a recipient -- jointly with Joseph Rotblat, then President of Pugwash --  of the 1995 Nobel Peace Prize "for their efforts to diminish the part played by nuclear arms in international politics and in the longer run to eliminate such arms."

 Cool Numbers

We call "cool" a number such that its decimal representation (for simplicity, we stick to the standard representation in base 10) has a remarkable look. For instance, the fraction 10/81=2*5/3^4 has the decimal representation 0.[1234567 90] and the fraction 1000/998001=2^3*5^3/(3^6*37^2) has the decimal representation 0.[001 002 003 ... 009 010 011 ... 099 100 101 ... 996 997 999 000] . In these decimal expressions blanks have been introduced merely as visual aids (they should be ignored, having no mathematical significance), dots indicate many digits to be filled in by obvious interpolation, and square brackets indicate that the digits inside them (9 in the first example,  999*3=2997 in the second) are to be repeated periodically ad infinitum. Another cool number having no periodic part in its decimal representation is
 
(1000-10^(-2997)*999001)/999^2=0.001 002 003 ... 009 010 011 ... 099 100 101... 997 998 999.

A technique to identify such numbers will be described.

Reference: F. Calogero, Cool Irrational Numbers and Their Rather Cool Rational Approximations, Mathematical Intelligencer 25, 72-76 (2003).

 T. C. Wollan Memorial Distinguished Lectureship


The T. C. Wollan Memorial Distinguished Lectureship was founded in the mid-1960s with unrestricted funds received from the National Science Foundation in connection with the NSF Undergraduate Research Participation programs at Concordia College at that time. The lectures were named to honor the memory of Thomas Carl Wollan, who was remembered with fondness and respect as one of the founders of the mathematics program at Concordia.

No comments:

Post a Comment